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Experts not concerned with recent shark sightings

Viewer video shows a great white shark attacking a seal just off the beaches of Cape Cod. (Jillian Caplice)

BIDDEFORD (WGME) – Viewer video shows a great white shark attacking a seal just off the beaches of Cape Cod.

The videos were taken Thursday afternoon on Race Point Beach in Provincetown.

No humans were attacked, but the beach is closed to all swimming right now.

The sightings came one day after a shark attack in the waters off Cape Cod.

Thursday night, the victim remains in serious condition at a Massachusetts hospital.

The 61-year-old New York man was standing just 30 yards off the beach when the attack happened.

Witnesses say they saw him bleeding heavily while lying on the water’s edge.

Two recent nursing school grads were first on the scene.

Dozens of bystanders came together to get the victim up a large sand dune and to a rescue helicopter.

That beach remains closed Thursday night.

In Maine, shark attacks are very rare, but there are sharks in the water off our coast.

Dr. James Sulikowski has been studying sharks for over 20 years and believes what happened on the Cape wasn't an attack. He calls it "an interaction," and once the shark realized the person wasn't what it was looking for, it let go.

"They really don't want to eat us,” Sulikowski said. “They have no real desire to do that. It's all mistaken identity. You know, a white shark that has a mouth like that, that takes a bite that's exploratory, is often times fatal."

He says sharks can be confused by a person's actions in water.

"So when we're splashing, and doing things, we may have a shiny watch or whatever,” Sulikowski said. “It's a slight indication of there's something there that looks, or sounds like, or feels like, what I might eat."

For swimmers and surfers, that can be frightening to hear.

"Every time they hear these things, it's in the back of their minds, it's like something's going to eat me," Sulikowski said.

Despite these shark sightings, Dr. Sulikowski says it's still perfectly safe to get to the beach like many Mainers are still doing this summer.

"If you look at Massachusetts, you look here in Maine, over the last almost 200 years there's only been five interactions," Sulikowski said.

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